'Vote!' found at https://flic.kr/p/4qphFv by kristin_a (Meringue Bake Shop) (https://flickr.com/people/kristinausk) used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)
'Vote!' found at https://flic.kr/p/4qphFv by kristin_a (Meringue Bake Shop) (https://flickr.com/people/kristinausk) used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)
'Vote!' found at https://flic.kr/p/4qphFv by kristin_a (Meringue Bake Shop) (https://flickr.com/people/kristinausk) used under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/)
With the midterm elections nearly upon us (and thus nearly over!), we have been bombarded with a few versions of this question.  Current clients, prospective clients, businesses and other concerned parties wonder how the results of next Tuesday's election may impact current immigration policy, as well as the prospects for future immigration reform.

The optimist in us sees the potential for positive change on the horizon.  The realist in us is not so sure, at least in the near term.

Comprehensive Immigration Reform has been a critical priority since it became obvious that the drastic changes to our immigration law in 1994-1996 were little more than widescale punitive measures, adversely impacting non-citizens and U.S. citizens alike.  One major challenge to obtaining reasonable immigration reform is that, by definition, non-citizens don't vote, and therefore their political voice in this country can be all-too-easily ignored. 

Going one step further, many a prominent public crisis provokes an anti-immigration-reform response: Are we having a slow economic recovery? Limit immigration.  Is ISIS threatening us?  Tighten border security.  Ebola scare? Institute a travel ban and quarantine anyone coming in from affected areas.  Just as comprehensive immigration reform is not a panacea to all of our current problems, immigration restrictionism is not a viable solution to any of today's societal challenges.

We take hope in some of the recent administrative measures adopted by the current administration, notably Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals [DACA], and Stateside/Provisional Waivers for families facing unlawful presence bars.

But, true Comprehensive Immigration Reform is going to take bold leadership from both major political parties, as well as a more fact-based understanding of what non-citizens contribute to our country's economy and cultural heritage.

All we can really say about this is, "Stay tuned".