'Hourglass timers' found at https://flic.kr/p/euziE5 by p_a_h (https://flickr.com/people/pahudson) used under Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)
'Hourglass timers' found at https://flic.kr/p/euziE5 by p_a_h (https://flickr.com/people/pahudson) used under Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)
'Hourglass timers' found at https://flic.kr/p/euziE5 by p_a_h (https://flickr.com/people/pahudson) used under Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/)
On November 20, 2014, President Barack Obama announced sweeping policy changes relating to the Executive Branch's enforcement of U.S. immigration law.  The President's speech received massive media coverage, and generated spirited discussions about its legality and desirability.  But, with the holiday season in full swing, a complex federal budget on the table, and the transition of the U.S. Senate to a Republican majority, the immigration fervor has quieted down, at least temporarily.

In order to put a policy declaration into effect, the federal government must follow a number of established rules and procedures. As the Department of Homeland Security explains, "Over the coming months, USCIS will produce detailed explanations, instructions, regulations and forms as necessary." 

USCIS has announced time estimates for some of the key Executive Action initiatives, as follow:
  • Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program - On or about February 20, 2015 [90 days from the announcement]
  • Deferred Action for Parents of U.S. Citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAP) - On or about May 20, 2015 [180 days from the announcement]
  • Provisional Waivers of Unlawful Presence - Exact implementation to be determined [Per USCIS, "upon issuing of new guidelines and regulations."]
At this time, interested parties find themselves in a "hurry-up-and-wait" posture.  Anyone who does believe that she or he will benefit from any portion of the new initiatives should already be collecting required supporting evidence. This includes identity documents (such as passports); proof of a qualifying relationship to a U.S. citizen or Lawful Permanent Resident; and,evidence of continuous residence in the United States over the past five-plus years.

Also, we remind our readers yet again to avoid being scammed by opportunists seeking to capitalize on people's hope.  USCIS is trying to warn people: click here.  The American Immigration Lawyers' Association (AILA) is asking its members to warn and educate people: click here.  And, of course, we are always available to answer questions and assess filing eligibility, at info@immigsolutions.com, or by calling us at +1(603)792-VISA [603-792-8472]